Go!

American best-selling author, H. Jackson Brown Jr. had this advice: “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

That quote was made several decades ago, when travel was slower, more expensive and difficult. Today, with our highly interconnected world, it is so much easier to set off to explore the world. Perhaps more than just travelling, we can set our minds to sail away from the safe harbours of the mundane things we have become familiar with.The world is now constantly on the move. So we can set ourselves the target to learn something new each year. Challenge yourself to master a new skill or to do things differently.

As the year 2016 comes to a close, perhaps the best word to summarise my 2016 is the word “Go!”. Amongst other places, I finally visited the remaining two countries in ASEAN that I had then yet to visit. We even started business projects there, albeit cautiously on a small scale first.

2016 was a year that I set myself the target to venture out – in business, in travel and even in the things that I do. Driving a manual left-hand drive car in the crowded streets of central Vietnam was a first, and quite an adventure too, especially when the online navigator took us onto small paths we later found out were for motorbikes only. I had hesitated to turn into the small alleys but my Vietnamese friend with me (who was himself unfamiliar with the roads there), said, “Just go lah!”. Thankfully, we made it through after an arduous 30 minutes, with the car unscratched, squeezing with motor bikes and with padi fields inches to our left and to our right.

Learning to ski at 51 seemed ambitious and I had some nasty bruises to show for the many falls. Fortunately, I survived to continue with the rest of an all-AirBnB self-planned budget trip across South Korea with my family. Learning the hover board was thankfully much easier. Doing a live storytelling session was interesting, especially with a top radio DJ and a prize winning storyteller from USA in the same session as me. Doing live doodling performances on stage without my artists in three cities in China in front of officials and business leaders was initially intimidating. Learning to cook certainly benefited my family. I now have some decent dishes to show for a year of regular cooking :).

Not sure what 2017 will bring. Hopefully more interesting things to do, more projects to get ourselves busy with, and more places to see. Life is too short to hold back. Happy New Year and just go lah!

 

Thank you for 2015!

 

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Yes, 2015 has been an eventful year. Not the outcome we may wish for, but thanks for the journey.

Thanks for being with me on the journey.

Thanks to my wonderful team mates for being together in the contest.

Thanks to the many who had given so much of your time and resources. Thanks for your sweat, thanks for your tears. Thanks for your cheers, thanks for your hugs. Thanks for the many kilometres travelled together. Thanks for the new friends made, thanks for old friendships rekindled.

Thanks to the many who gave us drinks on our hot and tiring visits, and for the occasional snacks to give us the energy to go a bit longer. Thanks for your many words of encouragement.

Thanks for a year that I shall always remember.

To the many who had come my way this year, as William Shakespeare put it in the Twelfth Night, “I can no other answer make but thanks, and thanks, and ever thanks…”

See you all in 2016. Wishing everyone a fulfilling year ahead.

 

Places and buildings, Japan

Some buildings and places we visited in Japan, Nov-Dec 2015

Walking tour of West Shinjuku, Tokyo

Shinjuku-Mode Gakuen Cocoon-skyscrapper

The Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower in Shinjuku

Tokyo-ViewFromShinjuuku Sumitomo Building 45th

View from the observation tower on the 45th floor of the Shinjuku Sumitomo Tower. Entrance is free.

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Inside view of the Shinjuku Sumitomo Tower

Tokyo-WorldLargestPendulumClock - Shinjuku NS Building

World’s largest pendulum clock in Shinjuku NS Tower. We visited the skywalk bridge and found to our pleasant surprise that there were many reasonably priced eateries there for such an expensive looking place.

 

Miyajima, one of top 3 official scenic spots of Japan

MiyajimaShrine-lowtide

The famed Itsukushima shrine in Miyajima at low tide with a multitude of visitors on a public holiday.

JapaneseWithCoatsInMiyajimaShrine

No obstacles can stop these business professionals from visiting the shrine, not even having to carry luggages over the sand and to brave the huge crowd on a public holiday.

 

ColoursOfAutumn-Stream-Miyajima

Flowing stream and autumn leaves

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A shop sign in Miyajima. Someone should ask President Obama if he likes green tea ice cream. We did anyway 🙂 President Obama did visit Tokyo, Japan in April 2014 and perhaps green tea ice-cream was served?

Naritansan Shinshoji Temple and Garden, Narita Town

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An old Pagoda

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A closer look at the pointed roof of a temple building

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Shadow selfie – lots of photos to take in this beautiful temple and garden!

 

More Temples, Shrines and Castles

Kyoto

Himeji

 

Towers, towers everywhere, in cities and in towns

Osaka-Shinsekai.jpg

Cycling past the Tsutenkaku Tower in Osaka’s Shinseikai area, originally builit in 1912 supposedly inspired by the Eiffel Tower in Paris and rebuilt after the war . Weather was nasty during our stay in Osaka, with intermittent rains

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Goryokaku Tower, Hakodate

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Zoomed-in view of Goryokaku Tower and its neighbourhood from Mount Hakodate in late afternoon

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Kyoto Tower on a gloomy and rainy day

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View of Sendai from hotel room on 18th floor, with a building towering over its neighbourhood.

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Sleepless in Sendai. Night scene from hotel room, facing the tower

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The 100m tall Beppu Tower in the background on a late afternoon

 

Matsushima, another  of the three most scenic places in Japan

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“Matsu” means pine or 松. You will find lots of pine trees here, little islands, clear blue waters, beautiful sky and lots of boats. Well worth the slow 40 minutes train ride from Sendai.

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The 252m-long bridge to Fukuura island

MatsushimaShore

YeeJJ-walking-Matsushima

Perfect weather for a walking tour of the bay of Matsushima

 

Hakodate, viewed from Mount Hakodate from 330pm till 5pm

 

The 8 hotspring “hells’ of Beppu

and some the animals and plants in the “hells”

 

Hiroshima Atomic Peace Memorial Park

 

Toya – Nishiyama and the destruction caused by Mount Usu’s eruptions

and the cold, cold walk after last night’s snow

 

Lake Toya, where G8 leaders met in 2008

Colours of autumn, Japan

Late autumn in Japan, 2015

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Garden in Naritan-san Temple, Narita city

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Shades of colours – Garden in Narita-san Temple

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Red tree in Nijo castle, Kyoto

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Matsushima mid morning sun

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Multi-coloured tree in the morning, Himeji castle

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Himeji castle, late afternoon

Glowing-volcano-island

A glowing Nakajima island in Lake Toya in the evening. The orange glow on the island is from the sun breaking through holes in the cloud

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Colourful hell – at one of the 8 hotspring “Hells” of Beppu

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Evening, Hiroshima Atomic Dome

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Hiroshima waterfront evening

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View from Mount Hakodate in late afternoon

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Night at Hakodate old public hall

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Lady in blue on multi-coloured fallen leaves, Kyoto

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I’ll be back. An almost bare tree in Narita town readying itself for winter. See you in spring.

 

Christmas Colours, Hakodate on 28 Nov 2015, the night of the light up

 

Christmas lights in Beppu

People of Japan

Here are some photographs with people as the main theme from my recent Nov-Dec 2015 travel to Japan.

Religion

JapaneseWithCoatsInMiyajimaShrine

Three business professionals with luggages in the sand at low tide at Miyajima Itsukushima Shrine on a public holiday. The island was jammed packed with people everywhere. We found out later that it was a long weekend.

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Devotees zooming in on the incense burner at the centre of the Naritasan Shinshoji Temple. People were literally fanning the fumes into their nose, presumably to cleanse themselves or to take in the blessings.

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Queuing for blessings in Miyajima

Trades

PreparingLiveEels-Filming

A chef in Narita’s Omote Sando Street  masterfully prepares a live eel while camera crew films him in action. The street has many restaurants serving eel meals and they proudly put their chefs in front for passer-bys to see how they skilfully prepares the food. We tried the meal at a restaurant that had a reasonably priced set lunch. Oishi-desu!

Himeji-NoodlesHouseFamily

A noodle shop in Himeji with very high tripadvisor’s rating. We found out why after trying it ourselves. Inexpensive and prepared right before your eyes from raw flour.

OldManSellingFood-Miyajima

An elderly street vendor at Miyajima preparing our BBQ squid snack. Many stalls were run by elderly folks.

Miyajima-agingSamurai

A rather elderly man hired to dress as a Samurai warrior in Miyajima. This was by a company providing costumes for rent. From Himeji castle to Miyajima, we noticed that a number of those dressed in these traditional costumes were the senior workers.

PerformingMonkey-Miyajima

Not a person, but a performing monkey in Miyajima working for a busker.

JapaneseWorkersRoad

A group of all Japanese workers working on the pavements. Despite an ageing population and expensive labour costs, Japan relies almost entirely on locals for its workforce. We did find a Cambodian adult student working in a supermarket and two China adult students working at a restaurant. They all speak Japanese.

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The reason why plants are so nicely manicured in Japan. Workers carefully trimming the trees at mid day.

 

Life

Wedding-Himeji-Couple

Wedding-Himeji-InLaws

Chanced upon this couple whom I think were getting married. They were waiting to enter  a shrine next to Himeji castle while two lines of people waited inside next to the red carpet. I presume they were the immediate families of the couple. They greeted and bowed to one another as the whole process was captured on video.

Aomori-Market-oldlady.jpg

An old lady with walking aid inched her way slowly through the market in Aomori as customers zipped around the centre. Japan has been dealing with issues of an ageing population.

Miyajima-LongQueue

Singaporeans aren’t the only ones who love queuing. A long queue for sweet potato ice-cream in Miyajima. We paid in front thinking that was the queue for the ice-cream. It turned out that we bought only the tokens for the ice-cream and had to wait another 30 minutes to get the ice-cream. The queue snake all the way into the shop and there were several turns inside! We queued many times during our trip, get to trains, for rides in Disney, for food, and many more! Yes, we were told by local that they do queue overnight for launches of highly sought after products too.

WearyTraveller-HakodateGoryokakuTower

Yes, travel can be exhausting. A weary traveller totally knocked out at a bench inside Goryokaku Tower, Hakodate. He seemed to be from a Taiwanese tour group, some of whom were watching a performance at the hall.

 

 

Rolling through the land of the rising sun

It has been a long while since I got to travel for 15 days at a stretch. We decided to get a JR Rail Pass and do a DIY getaway. Our travel took us from Tokyo to Beppu in the south (Kyushu island), north to Hakodate and then back to Narita for the flight back. We had stopovers in Himeji, Hiroshima, Miyajima, Osaka, Kyoto, Kokura, Sendai, Matsushima, Aomori and Toya, some of which were just day trips from a nearby town.

Yeejj-cycling-Himeji

Cycling from our AirBnB homestay in Himeji to the station. We had loaned out free bicycles from the Tourism office next to the station and decided to cycle with our luggages from our stay near the castle to the station before returning the bikes. When we first arrived, we had to walk nearly 40 minutes to find this house (Google map said 20 minutes walk only!). I thought that bicycling with our roller luggages for our return may be better. Turned out to be challenging as we had to cycle mostly on pavements and there were curbs and lots of bumps. We managed eventually. Do look for the free bicycles at the Tourism office (office hours only, first come first serve). Without luggages, Himeji is a nice place for cycling.

It was quite an experience travelling some 4,500 km without any private transport or taxi. The trip was done entirely by trains, trams, buses, boats, occasional cycling and lots of walking with our roller luggages. We experienced both peak and off peak travels, including the famed Tokyo peak hour trains. For some cities, we bought the day passes for either trams or buses or subways, depending on our travel plans if it works out to be cheaper than the rather expensive individual rides.

Pork buns at Kokura

Looking for food near Kokura station on the northern tip of Kyushu island while waiting for the connecting train to Beppu. We found this eatery from Tripadvisor but discovered that it was actually a takeaway kiosk and not a sit down dining. We tried it anyway. Juicy buns but not the food we were yearning for after a long ride from Osaka.

When in Japan, do as the Japanese do. We often bought along our pre-packed food and start our picnic on the long Shinkansen (bullet train) rides the moment we got to our seats. The system is so efficient that we can stopover at an intermediary city just to catch a meal at a restaurant near the station that has great online reviews and then catch another train after our meal, carefully timing our stops and monitoring the schedules.

HokkaidoTrainSchedule

A train schedule for Hokkaido. Trains are relatively infrequent here and you will need to plan carefully to minimise waiting times or to avoid missing the last train back!

A bus schedule in Beppu, a quiet town in the southern island of Kyushu

A bus schedule in Beppu, a quiet town in the southern island of Kyushu. We usually snap pictures of schedules at the stations so that we can plan our return after visiting an attraction.

The transport system was amazingly efficient, even on networks that are decades old. We relied on the published timetables. Train were reliable to the exact minute arriving and departing at the various stations we were at. The punctuality was critical for planning especially in the more remote parts of Japan where transport services were often infrequent. We wanted to minimise waiting time and had to match the timetables of trains and bus / tram services.

My most frequently used words for the trip? “Sumimasen, xxxx wa doko desu ka?” (or “Excuse me, where is xxxx?” as we stop strangers and transport officials and ask for directions getting around to new hotels, to restaurants that were highly rated on travel sites and to the many places of attractions. Almost all whom we had asked tried their best to be helpful, giving us instructions which we often cannot quite fully comprehend due to our very limited range of Japanese vocabulary. However with sign language, we can roughly figure out and get near enough to our destination to ask another random stranger if we need to again. Some were even so helpful that they walked part of the way with us. A young lady even used her mobile app to translate her instructions into English for us!

Beppu-bus depot

Stopping at the office of a bus company in Beppu to explore transport options. We eventually took the day pass from another bus operator which had better connections to the places of attractions we wanted to visit. Enquiring at bus stations, train stations and Tourism offices was something we did a lot at every new town to make sure that we get the transport options right to start off the visit to the town.

I must say Japan is a relatively safe place as we navigated sometimes early in the morning to sometimes late at night, in both busy and quieter areas feeling completely safe all the time. Bicycles are commonly used by Japanese but not always safe as roads can be busy and there are no bicycle lanes. Bicycles often share the pedestrian walkways but I notice that cyclists are careful to coexist safely with pedestrians.

Have travel passes, will travel!

Sharon-PointingDirection

Sumimasen, xxx wa doko desu ka?

Pawnbrokers Bill

I delivered the following speech in Parliament on 19 January 2015.

This Bill seeks to update the Pawnbrokers Act which was last amended in 1993. Amongst others, it removes the existing auction system, requires pawnbrokers to provide an indicative valuation of a pledge to a pawner at the point of pawning and at the end of the redemption period, and raises the minimum paid-up capital of pawnbrokers for their first outlet and for each subsequent branch.

Madam Speaker, I support the Bill. I am concerned though about the rise in the number of pawnshops and in the total value of pawnbrokering loans in recent years. The number of pawnshops has grown from 114 in 2008 to 217[1] as at June 2014. The value of pawnbrokering loans rose more than three times from S$2 billion in 2009 to a peak of S$7.1 billion in 2012[2]. Many of the pawnshops are in the HDB heartlands. In an earlier parliament reply, we are told that HDB does not generally limit the number of shops for each trade and leaves it to market forces to determine the trade mix of shops. Market forces have indeed led to the rise of the pawnbroking industry.

In our geographically small island state, with some 217 outlets, access to pawnshops for a quick loan is easy. This has prompted some journalists to cast the spotlight on our pawnbrokering industry which now has three publicly listed pawnbrokers as key players in the market. A Bloomberg report in June last year titled “Rolex for Casino Cash Fuels Singapore Pawnshop Growth”[3] highlighted stories and statements by industry players about the rise in pawnbrokering activities being driven by gambling. The report, as well as other reports[4] [5], also pointed to soaring living costs as another reason for Singaporeans to turn to easy credit sources such as pawnbrokers to cover their living expenses.

Madam Speaker, there is very little data available on the profile of pawners. The ministry has said that it does not track the reason for non-redemption of pledges[6]. While the overall percentage is small at 5%[7], 5% of 4 million valuables pawned in 2012 works out to around 200,000 items that were unredeemed and had to be sent for auction. We do not know how many of these 200,000 items were from pawners who repeatedly failed to redeem their valuables. We also do not know the reasons for these non-redemptions.

I’d like to call for a more detailed study on the profile of pawners and on the industry. In particular, we should look at those who do not redeem their valuables to understand the underlying reasons. Also, in order not to become a society with excessive pawning, the study can also look into the appropriate number of outlets in each neighbourhood and if the level and content of advertising should be subjected to some controls. I believe better data will be useful to help look into the underlying causes for the rapid rise in the pawnbrokering trade and how we can tweak the Pawnbrokers Bill in future to continue to keep pace with this industry’s changing landscape.

Thank you.

[1] http://business.asiaone.com/news/pawnshops-the-rise

[2] http://tablet.todayonline.com/singapore/removal-auction-system-among-proposed-pawnbrokers-act-changes

[3] http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-17/rolex-for-casino-cash-fuels-singapore-pawnshop-growth.html

[4] https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/singapore-cost-living-sees-pawnshops-043309125.html

[5] http://www.fool.sg/2013/11/04/the-battle-of-the-pawnbrokers/

[6] http://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00006308-WA&currentPubID=00006301-WA&topicKey=00006301-WA.00006308-WA_1%2Bid-da07f921-38d6-46fc-8a85-f7f746df8cfd%2B

[7] http://news.asiaone.com/print/News/Latest%2BNews/Singapore/Story/A1Story20130527-425418.html

 

My 50 Years With Singapore

Photo with mum and siblings taken at the old Nantah University at age 9. I am on the extreme left.

Photo with mum and siblings taken at the old Nantah University at age 9. I am on the extreme left. Once in a while, we will get all dressed up and dad would drive us to interesting places in Singapore. I remember admiring the grandeur of the place, built mostly by donations from the Chinese community. The next time I would set foot in the university was as a student representing Temasek Junior College in the annual pre-university seminar in 1982. By then, Nantah had ceased to exist and it was part of the National University of Singapore. Much later in the 1990s, I completed my MBA from the Nanyang Business School, which is located near where this picture was taken. It had by then been changed into the Nanyang Technological University, our 2nd university. So in my first three occasions to step into the university, it had three different identities, a reflection of the changing situation surrounding its controversial early years.

The Straits Times featured me alongside four other Members of Parliament in its article of the same title today. My original text is reproduced below. Added other photos too to complete this post.

On growing up in Singapore over the last 50 years:

I grew up in Opera Estate, living with my parents – both of them teachers – and three siblings.

Just behind our house was Kampong Chai Chee, which had some small farms then. The farmers would sometimes take food waste from our house for their animals and give us eggs on festive occasions.

Afternoons were usually spent exploring the neighbourhood on my rickety bicycle, or playing with neighbours. Once in a while, we would get a supper treat when dad came home with his pay from giving tuition.

I have happy memories of schooling, which were all in neighbourhood schools in the east. Many of my friends went through the same schools from primary school till junior college.

I remember the numerous campaigns in schools, such as Use Your Hands (encouraging students to take care of their surroundings), Anti-littering, Courtesy, and so on. I enjoyed these campaigns and other shared experiences with my peers.

I now have children of my own. My wish is to see a more resilient new generation of Singaporeans so that we can chart a better future for our children.

My wish for Singapore politics in the next 50 years:

I hope to see a more resilient political system, where people of different ideologies can play their parts to develop Singapore, and where there are strong and independent institutions to provide checks and balances for a stronger democracy.
I have always believed that Singapore has enough talent for more than one team. I hope to see the day that enough people will come forward in the political scene so that there will be viable alternatives in the political system.

————————–
Yes, growing up in Singapore was memorable. I could only use about 200 words for the ST article. I had found other interesting photos while searching for the above for ST, which I have inserted below.

With paternal grandmother in Ipoh. I had lived the first 2 years of my life with my grandparents in Gopeng (near Ipoh) as both my parents had to work and they already had two elder siblings to look after.

With paternal grandmother in Ipoh. I had lived the first 2 years of my life with my grandparents in Gopeng (near Ipoh) as both my parents had to work in Singapore and they already had my two elder siblings to look after.

At the tower of Seletar reservoir with family on another outing at around 7 years old. I must have opened my mouth to shout into the wind.

At the tower of Seletar reservoir with my family on another outing at around 7 years old. As a cheeky boy, I must have opened my mouth to shout into the wind.

Received a surprise gift of a live chicken from my college classmates for my 18th birthday in school.

Received a surprise gift of a live chicken from my college classmates for my 18th birthday in school.

I went to St. Stephen’s School near my house because dad wanted us to have an English-based education. My parents were Chinese teachers but they realised that it would be a dead end for us to go to a Chinese school given the strong switch to English as the medium of education throughout Singapore then. Most of my schoolmates and I graduated to St. Patrick’s for secondary school and later to Temasek Junior College. We studied hard but we also played hard. I ended up taking part in five CCA groups in college, something unheard of these days.

I had received my education entirely in Singapore, including for my postgraduate courses. It was during my working years that I got to travel more widely and became exposed to different forms for governance and political systems. I started to write to the forum pages of newspapers and international magazines.

With NUS Computing colleagues in Tokyo for my first overseas conference. My first job was teaching computer science at NUS.

With NUS Computing colleagues in Tokyo for my first overseas conference (3rd from left). My first job was teaching computer science at NUS while undergoing my postgraduate programme.

In Boys' Brigade officer uniform with my eldest child, then around 2 years old.

In Boys’ Brigade officer uniform with my eldest child, then around 2 years old. I had continued my active involvement in the community with various organisations even after I had started working.

MSF – KiFAS and Student Care

I delivered the following two speeches today during the Committee of Supply debate on Ministry of Social and Family:

Sir, I refer the Minister to the KiFAS portion of my Budget speech. I am puzzled that after review, KiFAS can only be used on kindergartens operated by MOE and Anchor Operators. Those that qualify for KiFAS form less than half of the some 500 kindergartens here. More than 95% of qualifying centres belongs to just PCF. Other than PCF and MOE centres, are there actually any other existing centres that are KiFAS approved today?

There are many good kindergartens, some with long history, like the ones my siblings and I attended some 40 to 50 years ago. KiFAS should apply to all registered kindergartens, just like its sister scheme, CFAC. CFAC can be used on all childcare centres. MOE saw it fit to support aided schools with religious affiliations. This government has pride our recent Budgets for being inclusive. I believe we can be more inclusive to allow more, if not all kindergartens to be KiFAS-supported.
 
 
Student Care Centres

Sir, we have seen a huge rise in the demand for child care. Of late, the government has put a lot of resources in this area.

However, I do not see the same being done for student care.  The same young working parents that use childcare services will need student care for their children, at least for the first few years of school.

Commercial SCCs are unattractive to run given the high cost of rent and lack of government support, compared to childcare. MSF website listed 207 student care centres, of which a good number are tuition or childcare centres. These may take a very small number for student care, if at all, as their other operations are generally more profitable. Good student care services could eliminate the need for tuition. Is the current supply of student care places sufficient for our increasing needs?

Student care operations are also not subjected to the ministry’s supervision for quality, unlike childcare. SCCs are not required to be licensed and are not subjected to regular checks by MSF. Their staffs need not attain minimum qualifications and training.

I urge the government to extend better funding and resource support to this sector, create more places, work with MOE to have SCCs in all schools, and to provide closer supervision of the quality of operations.


MOT – Bicycle Safe Singapore

I delivered the following speech during the MOT Committee of Supply debate on 11 March 2014:

YJJ Cycling to BridgeMadam, two months ago, I did a day-long cycling trip through San Francisco (SF), on a working weekday, from the bustling financial and shopping areas to the Golden Gate Bridge and back. It was a refreshing experience. Even in the busy downtown, there were clear bicycle lanes marked out for cyclists. Where there were no dedicated bicycle lanes, the slow lane was marked as a shared lane between motorists and cyclists. Motorists that were on the shared lane followed behind us. In some suburbs without any marked lanes, motorists waited patiently for us to cross the road junctions. They kept a safe distance when overtaking us.

Bicycles were allowed onto trains and subways. There were shared bicycle kiosks in many parts of the city where one could book out a bike and return it at another kiosk. It is no wonder that many in SF commute to work by cycling.

There are other examples of bicycle friendly cities. In Copenhagen, cycling is already the most popular mode of transport and the city has set even ambitious cycling KPIs, such as for bicycling to capture 50% of all modes of transport to school or work. The city has dedicated lanes and special short cut paths for cyclists. It takes a whole-of-city approach to encourage cycling by reducing travel time on popular routes and made roads safer and more comfortable for cyclists.

I acknowledge that the government has implemented some cycling paths and plans to have more. Having experienced San Francisco, I hope the government can set even more ambitious targets to make cycling safer and more comfortable here so many more can use it as a preferred mode of transport. We can start with new towns by having more dedicated bicycle lanes on roads and to have a more aggressive national campaign to cultivate respect for the roads between cyclists and motorists.